Expressions of Hate: Seattle Buddhist Temple is set on fire

Today, we’re talking about Expressions of Hate, focusing on the recent fires at the Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple. My cousin shared news of two fires, and it’s alarming how many of these incidents target Asians. The fires at the temple aren’t just physical damage; they erase chunks of history. Let’s talk about that impact on Japanese Americans in Seattle.

We will end on a positive note with “Little Things Mean a Lot” victories. Learn about the new Asian American Book store called “Mam” in the Seattle International District. Meet owner Sokha Danh.

SHOW NOTES

Expressions of Hate: Seattle Buddhist Temple is set on fire.

Cliff Notes

Introduction:

  – Host Jolene Jang invites listeners to explore stories from Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander perspectives.

  – Targets business professionals interested in sustainability and community building.

 

Main Topic – Expressions of Hate at Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple:

  – Recent incident: Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple set on fire on New Year’s Eve.

  – Emotional impact: Loss of a central hub for the Japanese American community since 1901.

  – Historical context: Discussion on redlining and segregation affecting minority communities.

  – WWII impact: Hate towards Japanese Americans during internment; loss of historical records in the fire.

Personal Connections to the Temple:

  – Central role: Host’s parents’ marriage, aunt’s marriage, and various community events held at the temple.

  – Cultural significance: Participation in street festivals, Japanese dancing, and hosting basketball leagues.

  – Loss of history: Destruction of valuable information stored at the temple.

Little things mean a lot – Mam’s Books:

  – Introduction to a new Cambodian Asian bookstore named “Mam’s Books” in Seattle’s International District.

  – Purpose: Showcasing Southeast Asian and Cambodian American experiences.

  – Empowering narrative: Countering the outsider portrayal of immigrants and refugees.

Community Voices:

  – Perspectives from individuals involved with Mam’s Books, emphasizing the collective effort in creating the bookstore.

  – Reflection on the importance of preserving neighborhood history and legacy.

Broader Impact:

  – Excitement about the growing presence of Asian-American bookstores, highlighting developments in various states.

  – Empowerment on social media: Examples of individuals sharing cultural traditions on LinkedIn.

Addressing Hate:

  – Acknowledgment of the prevalence of expressions of hate against Asians.

  – Encouragement to take action: Joining Facebook groups like “Empowered Asians” and “Asian Allies.”

Call to Action:

  – Highlighting the ongoing dialogue within Facebook groups on addressing hate and promoting community involvement.

  – Availability on Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube for further engagement.

Closing:

  – Affirmation: Asians are not alike.

  – Anticipation for future discussions and engagement with the audience.

Loose Transcription

(00:02) Aren’t Asians All alike? Find out here for stories from Asian-Americans, Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Whether you’re a business pro aiming for sustainability or just keen on building a kinder community, stay tuned. I’m Jolene Jang from Seattle. In this episode, we delve into expressions of hate aimed at Asian American Buddhists and counterbalance it with the uplifting victories.

(00:39) Received a message last night from my cousin about the Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple being set ablaze on New Year’s Eve. Some might think, “What’s the big deal about a fire when no one is hurt?” True, but the loss is profound. Let me share about this Buddhist temple, a core of the Japanese American Community.

(01:14) Redlining’s impact surfaces, concentrating 12,000 Japanese Americans and 12,000 black folks in the Central Area. Delbert Richardson’s signs, like “no Ethiopians, no orientals,” underline the discrimination. Check my resource files on Jolene Jang for more.

(02:11) Amid World War II, hate targeted Americans of Japanese descent, incarcerated and living in horse stalls. The Seattle Betsuin Temple housed invaluable family information, now lost in the fire. In 1948, it even started a Boy Scout Troop.

(03:31) Transitioning to a brighter note, let’s talk about “Mam’s Books,” a new Asian-American bookstore in Seattle. It showcases the Southeast Asian and Cambodian American experience, breaking stereotypes about immigrants and refugees being outsiders.

(08:50) Ron Chew, part of the community, shares the bookstore’s significance and the evolution of the Asian-American diaspora. It’s not just his store; it’s a collective achievement. Empowerment is palpable, and the Asian-American footprint in bookstores is expanding from New York to California.

(12:26) Wrapping up, expressions of hate are unfortunate, but little victories matter. Explore resource links, understand the history of the Buddhist temple, delve into redlining, and educate yourself. Join my Facebook groups, Empowered Asians and Asian Allies, to actively contribute and prevent such incidents in your community.

(12:57) Find me on Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Until next time, remember, Asians are diverse, and each story contributes to a richer tapestry.

This is your first episode sharing Expressions of Hate, and unfortunately, it is a daily occurrence.  Hopefully, you’ll get curious about learning about other cultures. Go ahead and subscribe to my podcast. You can see the visual version on YouTube and Spotify. Until the next podcast, aren’t Asians all alike? No, no, no.

Asians are not alike.

Find your favorite Podcast Platform

Click on the podcast player of your your choice to listen to the podcast on your player. On Spotify, there are videos and even poll engagement. Y
Or you can also listen on this website.

Podcast Player Spotify - green symbol icon     Podcast Player Amazon Music     Podcast player, Iheartradio icon     Youtube icon

Picture of an Asian woman wearing a white suit on a red background pointing to the words "Aren't Asians All Alike? PocastAren’t Asians All Alike Podcast

Find the answer here. Jolene tackles Asian challenges in this unfiltered podcast, sharing personal stories and offering bold, vulnerable, no-codeswitching talk. The goal is to make you think, reflect, and make better choices by understanding the impact of today’s actions.

 

Tune in for stories from Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander voices. Meet courageous Asian Allies. The impact of these stories aims to make you pause and inspire action. It’s a bold space for authentic conversations, unheard stories, and empowerment.

Expressions of Hate: Seattle Buddhist Temple is set on fire

Today, we’re talking about Expressions of Hate, focusing on the recent fires at the Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple. My cousin shared news of two fires, and it’s alarming how many of these incidents target Asians. The fires at the temple aren’t just physical damage; they erase chunks of history. Let’s talk about that impact on Japanese Americans in Seattle.

We will end on a positive note with “Little Things Mean a Lot” victories. Learn about the new Asian American Book store called “Mam” in the Seattle International District. Meet owner Sokha Danh.

SHOW NOTES

Expressions of Hate: Seattle Buddhist Temple is set on fire.

Cliff Notes

Introduction:

  – Host Jolene Jang invites listeners to explore stories from Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander perspectives.

  – Targets business professionals interested in sustainability and community building.

 

Main Topic – Expressions of Hate at Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple:

  – Recent incident: Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple set on fire on New Year’s Eve.

  – Emotional impact: Loss of a central hub for the Japanese American community since 1901.

  – Historical context: Discussion on redlining and segregation affecting minority communities.

  – WWII impact: Hate towards Japanese Americans during internment; loss of historical records in the fire.

Personal Connections to the Temple:

  – Central role: Host’s parents’ marriage, aunt’s marriage, and various community events held at the temple.

  – Cultural significance: Participation in street festivals, Japanese dancing, and hosting basketball leagues.

  – Loss of history: Destruction of valuable information stored at the temple.

Little things mean a lot – Mam’s Books:

  – Introduction to a new Cambodian Asian bookstore named “Mam’s Books” in Seattle’s International District.

  – Purpose: Showcasing Southeast Asian and Cambodian American experiences.

  – Empowering narrative: Countering the outsider portrayal of immigrants and refugees.

Community Voices:

  – Perspectives from individuals involved with Mam’s Books, emphasizing the collective effort in creating the bookstore.

  – Reflection on the importance of preserving neighborhood history and legacy.

Broader Impact:

  – Excitement about the growing presence of Asian-American bookstores, highlighting developments in various states.

  – Empowerment on social media: Examples of individuals sharing cultural traditions on LinkedIn.

Addressing Hate:

  – Acknowledgment of the prevalence of expressions of hate against Asians.

  – Encouragement to take action: Joining Facebook groups like “Empowered Asians” and “Asian Allies.”

Call to Action:

  – Highlighting the ongoing dialogue within Facebook groups on addressing hate and promoting community involvement.

  – Availability on Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube for further engagement.

Closing:

  – Affirmation: Asians are not alike.

  – Anticipation for future discussions and engagement with the audience.

Loose Transcription

(00:02) Aren’t Asians All alike? Find out here for stories from Asian-Americans, Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Whether you’re a business pro aiming for sustainability or just keen on building a kinder community, stay tuned. I’m Jolene Jang from Seattle. In this episode, we delve into expressions of hate aimed at Asian American Buddhists and counterbalance it with the uplifting victories.

(00:39) Received a message last night from my cousin about the Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple being set ablaze on New Year’s Eve. Some might think, “What’s the big deal about a fire when no one is hurt?” True, but the loss is profound. Let me share about this Buddhist temple, a core of the Japanese American Community.

(01:14) Redlining’s impact surfaces, concentrating 12,000 Japanese Americans and 12,000 black folks in the Central Area. Delbert Richardson’s signs, like “no Ethiopians, no orientals,” underline the discrimination. Check my resource files on Jolene Jang for more.

(02:11) Amid World War II, hate targeted Americans of Japanese descent, incarcerated and living in horse stalls. The Seattle Betsuin Temple housed invaluable family information, now lost in the fire. In 1948, it even started a Boy Scout Troop.

(03:31) Transitioning to a brighter note, let’s talk about “Mam’s Books,” a new Asian-American bookstore in Seattle. It showcases the Southeast Asian and Cambodian American experience, breaking stereotypes about immigrants and refugees being outsiders.

(08:50) Ron Chew, part of the community, shares the bookstore’s significance and the evolution of the Asian-American diaspora. It’s not just his store; it’s a collective achievement. Empowerment is palpable, and the Asian-American footprint in bookstores is expanding from New York to California.

(12:26) Wrapping up, expressions of hate are unfortunate, but little victories matter. Explore resource links, understand the history of the Buddhist temple, delve into redlining, and educate yourself. Join my Facebook groups, Empowered Asians and Asian Allies, to actively contribute and prevent such incidents in your community.

(12:57) Find me on Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Until next time, remember, Asians are diverse, and each story contributes to a richer tapestry.

This is your first episode sharing Expressions of Hate, and unfortunately, it is a daily occurrence.  Hopefully, you’ll get curious about learning about other cultures. Go ahead and subscribe to my podcast. You can see the visual version on YouTube and Spotify. Until the next podcast, aren’t Asians all alike? No, no, no.

Asians are not alike.

Find your favorite Podcast Platform

Click on the podcast player of your your choice to listen to the podcast on your player. On Spotify, there are videos and even poll engagement. Y
Or you can also listen on this website.

Podcast Player Spotify - green symbol icon     Podcast Player Amazon Music     Podcast player, Iheartradio icon     Youtube icon

Picture of an Asian woman wearing a white suit on a red background pointing to the words "Aren't Asians All Alike? PocastAren’t Asians All Alike Podcast

Find the answer here. Jolene tackles Asian challenges in this unfiltered podcast, sharing personal stories and offering bold, vulnerable, no-codeswitching talk. The goal is to make you think, reflect, and make better choices by understanding the impact of today’s actions.

 

Tune in for stories from Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander voices. Meet courageous Asian Allies. The impact of these stories aims to make you pause and inspire action. It’s a bold space for authentic conversations, unheard stories, and empowerment.

Lose Transcription

(00:02) Aren’t Asians All alike? Find out here for stories from Asian-Americans, Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Whether you’re a business pro aiming for sustainability or just keen on building a kinder community, stay tuned. I’m Jolene Jang from Seattle. In this episode, we delve into expressions of hate aimed at Asian American Buddhists and counterbalance it with the uplifting victories.

(00:39) Received a message last night from my cousin about the Seattle Betsuin Buddhist Temple being set ablaze on New Year’s Eve. Some might think, “What’s the big deal about a fire when no one is hurt?” True, but the loss is profound. Let me share about this Buddhist temple, a core of the Japanese American Community.

(01:14) Redlining’s impact surfaces, concentrating 12,000 Japanese Americans and 12,000 black folks in the Central Area. Delbert Richardson’s signs, like “no Ethiopians, no orientals,” underline the discrimination. Check my resource files on Jolene Jang for more.

(02:11) Amid World War II, hate targeted Americans of Japanese descent, incarcerated and living in horse stalls. The Seattle Betsuin Temple housed invaluable family information, now lost in the fire. In 1948, it even started a Boy Scout Troop.

(03:31) Transitioning to a brighter note, let’s talk about “Mam’s Books,” a new Asian-American bookstore in Seattle. It showcases the Southeast Asian and Cambodian American experience, breaking stereotypes about immigrants and refugees being outsiders.

(08:50) Ron Chew, part of the community, shares the bookstore’s significance and the evolution of the Asian-American diaspora. It’s not just his store; it’s a collective achievement. Empowerment is palpable, and the Asian-American footprint in bookstores is expanding from New York to California.

(12:26) Wrapping up, expressions of hate are unfortunate, but little victories matter. Explore resource links, understand the history of the Buddhist temple, delve into redlining, and educate yourself. Join my Facebook groups, Empowered Asians and Asian Allies, to actively contribute and prevent such incidents in your community.

(12:57) Find me on Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Until next time, remember, Asians are diverse, and each story contributes to a richer tapestry.

Asian American Bookstore – Mam’s

See the story from the Seattle Channel